The /Crunched\ Bottom


For most people stuck in the bottom of the hourglass, life is predictable enough. Every day they are forced to compete for shrinking opportunities while all too often pitted against their own legal system – if one exists at all. For though they form the bulk of the manufacturing base, carrying the heavy load of unreasonable demands from above, they receive little reward for their hard work. Without having any say in the real decision making, pushed aside whenever they are unlucky enough to find themselves on top of some natural or strategic resource that the elite want to get their hands on, they are handed the line: “To get poor people to work harder… pay them less.”

For those near the bottom of the corruption curve, it’s next to impossible to amass enough wealth to escape their situation or enough power to make their situation less intolerable.

For those near the bottom of the corruption curve, it’s next to impossible to amass enough wealth to escape their situation or enough power to make their situation less intolerable.

Adding insult to injury, the terrible and sinister elegance of a busted hourglass system means that those of us trapped in the bottom half still see our world as if it were a pyramid structure!

Worse yet, in a tightly constricting pyramid, although the elite use their inverted top half of the hourglass to keep the downtrodden outside and ignorant, they are more than happy to give these people enough autonomy and responsibility within their lower – upright pyramid – half of the hourglass to freely and continually participate in knocking each other down. It’s called unnecessary competition and permeates the crunched bottom.

Suddenly, we have all edged towards a very dangerous precipice, where everything threatens to come crashing down, and the only thing stopping this from happening is a stable middle. But just how well does a middle fare in an hourglass structure? Not very well at all…

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